Edmonton Eskimos

Morning after a good one for Eskimos QB Reilly and his knee

Morning after a good one for Eskimos QB Reilly and his knee

The good news for Mike Reilly and the many Edmonton Eskimos fans who will want to see him back in action this week is that he woke up Tuesday hurting in all of the right places.

 
 

Jason Gregor: Eskimos hope Reilly can improve receivers’ focus

Jason Gregor: Eskimos hope Reilly can improve receivers’ focus

The Edmonton Eskimo receivers have had a serious case of “Dropitis” all season long.

 
 

Tim Brown to miss Saturday’s Battle of Alberta rematch

Tim Brown to miss Saturday’s Battle of Alberta rematch

Calgary Stampeders coach John Hufnagel told News Talk 770 on Tuesday evening that returner Tim Brown will miss Saturday’s rematch with the Edmonton Eskimos.

 
 

Video: Crazy leaping jackrabbit star of the Labour Day classic

Video: Crazy leaping jackrabbit star of the Labour Day classic

A jackrabbit with insane moves did what the Eskimos could not do on Monday at McMahon Stadium: it got into end zone.

 
 

Former French legionnaire, Edmonton Eskimo among police graduates

Former French legionnaire, Edmonton Eskimo among police graduates

A former minesweeper with the French Foreign Legion who served in Afghanistan, Const. Marko Sabanovic was one of the graduates of the Edmonton Police Service’s recruit training class No. 139. In a plume of pageantry and tradition, 29 police officers including Sabanovic joined the service’s ranks Friday at a ceremony at City Hall. The new police boots pounding the city streets include a former Edmonton Eskimos player, a head chef, a firefighter and a street outreach worker. “It’s a goal of the service to recruit a diverse workforce,” said acting police chief Kevin Brezinski. “It’s reflective of the community.” Sabanovic, who is assigned to the west division, immigrated to Canada from Serbia in 2011 and moved to Edmonton in 2014

 
 

Saturday’s letters: Dental fee guide lacks teeth

Saturday’s letters: Dental fee guide lacks teeth

Our NDP government appears overjoyed with the 8.5-per-cent reduction in dental fees in the new guide. This now means Albertans will only be paying 35 per cent more than people in other provinces for common dental services. Hardly a windfall for Albertans! We should all be so excited as Health Minister Sarah Hoffman. What was missing in the press conference was whether the dental association would now be allowing their members to advertise their fees, which was the original intent back in 1997. The association currently forbids its members from advertising their fees for service.

 
 

Opinion: Have a conversation about Eskimos name but fight real racism

Opinion: Have a conversation about Eskimos name but fight real racism

Depending on who you talk to, the word Eskimo means either “snowshoe-netter” in Montagnais — or “eats something raw” in Cree. It is a 200-year-old Indigenous word from the fur trade era, which eventually had its spelling Anglicized and meaning slightly altered to “eaters of raw meat.” Today, however, some Inuit and Aboriginal people find this Indigenous word offensive —like the words “Indian” or “Half-Breed”– but many also do not. And it’s also a curious fact that both the Inuit and First Nations people once worked together — from 1957 to 1970 —through the “Indian-Eskimo Association of Canada,” to help advance the living conditions of Aboriginal people in this country. So, forgive me if I find this current, contrived debate on the team name of the Edmonton Eskimos mired in self-righteous, sanctimonious political correctness, as well as a repugnant political cowardice from Edmonton’s mayor, Alberta’s premier and Canada’s prime minister, who all say there should be a “conversation” about the Edmonton Eskimos using a 200-year-old Indigenous name for their team — while not having the political courage or moral fortitude to take a clear, unequivocal stand on this issue. In December 2015, Natan Obed, president of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), which represents over 60,000 Inuit people living in Canada, demanded in Nunatsiaq News that the Edmonton Eskimos change their name as he did not believe the Inuit should be used as mascots or emblems for a professional sports team — but he also carefully acknowledged that many Inuit people did not share his sense of outrage. But in July 2017, Obed snubbed a meeting in Edmonton with Canada’s premiers, along with the national leaders for First Nations and Metis people, which would have provided the perfect political forum to advance his concerns about the Edmonton Eskimos, as well as other issues of concern to the Inuit in Canada. So, one can very legitimately question just how concerned Obed really is about this issue especially when he so easily turned down a gold-plated political opportunity to forcefully advance his demand for a name change. And with respect to the Inuit being used as mascots or emblems, I have yet to see an Inuit man or woman hop on a dog sled and then madly circle the field every time Edmonton scores a touchdown. Come to think of it, I do not remember ever seeing any negative depictions of Inuit or Indigenous people whatsoever in all the years I’ve been watching the Edmonton Eskimos play — unlike every time the Chicago Blackhawks come to town with their made-up Indian name and ugly cartoon depiction of an Indigenous warrior

 
 

Reilly returns, but Stampeders score 12th straight win over Eskimos in Labour Day Classic

Reilly returns, but Stampeders score 12th straight win over Eskimos in Labour Day Classic

Running copy of Eskimos-Stampeders Labour Day Classic in Calgary.

 
 

Friday’s letters: Maas should own the error and move on

Friday’s letters: Maas should own the error and move on

Fans understand that players and assistant coaches cannot do anything but back Jason Maas’s decision, if they want to keep their jobs. But we know full well that Maas’s decision to kick a field goal instead of gambling on third down in the western final was idiotic. The fact that he will not admit it and clings to his empty approach is troubling. We only ask that he recognize his error and move on. The stance that general manager  Brock Sunderland takes is also troubling. Is it not the boss’s job to point out errors to his staff, just like Maas does every day with his staff? This by no means diminishes his respect and support of his coach. Let’s all admit that this was a bad scene and move on to a better year in 2018.   D.H

 
 

Thursday’s letters: The time for Coliseum proposals has passed

Thursday’s letters: The time for Coliseum proposals has passed

Re. “It’s too soon to put our storied white elephant out to pasture,” Paula Simons, Dec. 9 Paula Simons thinks that every single building in Edmonton should remain standing, forever — no matter what the public has to pay to fix or maintain it. She says we can’t rush to any decision on what happens with the Coliseum. Rush to a decision? We knew for at least three-four years that Rogers Place would be built. We knew for another three years worth of construction. And now we’ve known for the two years that Rogers Place has been in use that something has to be done with Northlands Coliseum.

 
 
 
 

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