Entertainment

Ties broken with Chris Craddock after ‘rape culture’ confession

Ties broken with Chris Craddock after ‘rape culture’ confession

Rapid Fire Theatre, Edmonton’s largest improv troupe, has issued a statement distancing itself from its former artistic director Chris Craddock, saying he will no longer be affiliated with the theatre company. “This week so many people around the world have engaged in a large conversation of sexual harassment and abuse; much of that conversation focusing on issues of sexual harassment and abuse in the entertainment industry. The improv industry has its fair share of predators and we know that at times in Rapid Fire Theatre’s 37-year history we have featured some of those individuals in our performing ensemble. Enough is enough,” says the statement, posted to Rapid Fire’s Facebook page Wednesday. “This includes the work of former artistic director (2004-2008) Chris Craddock who has publicly admitted to unacceptable behaviour in violation of our own harassment policy,” read the statement. It was signed by the company’s artistic director Matt Schuurman; its general manager, Karen Brown Fournell; and its board president, Amir Reshef.

 
 

10 things to do in Edmonton this week: Orchestrotica, Boo at the Zoo, and Roger Waters

10 things to do in Edmonton this week: Orchestrotica, Boo at the Zoo, and Roger Waters

Orchestrotica The first concert in the New Music Edmonton season brings together chamber music, global jazz, and exotica in the shape of Mr. Ho’s Orchestrotica. Think of them as the missing link between Martin Denny and Bach, or a lounge band pressed into service at a chamber concert. The quintet, led by artistic director and percussionist Brian O’Neill, digs through Bach, Gershwin, Shostakovitch, and a number of original compositions with eccentric arrangements and unusual instrumentation, resulting in pieces like the after-the-fact O’Neill/J.S. Bach collaboration, Would You Like Bongos With That Fugue?    When: Thursday, Oct. 19 at 7:30 p.m. Where: Studio 96, 10909 96 St.

 
 

#RIPGordDownie: Edmonton remembers a Canadian icon

#RIPGordDownie: Edmonton remembers a Canadian icon

As news of Gord Downie’s death broke Wednesday morning, Edmontonians took to social media to remember The Tragically Hip frontman. Downie died at the age of 53 after a year-long battle with brain cancer . Love. Selfless. Ultimate Canadian

 
 

Wildlife: Remembering Gord Downie’s mystery with some of his poetry

Wildlife: Remembering Gord Downie’s mystery with some of his poetry

Like many of you I eased up shaking and crying today as the buzzing notifications our country’s trickster poet had succumbed to his physical curse. As tributes and personal “I-was-there”s to Gord Downie fill the electronic river (and thank God we were there — together — right?) I’ll just leave you with some words from his poem, Mystery — one of the luminous highlights of his book Coke Machine Glow. They feel like they fit, just like he made us all feel from time to time in dusty fields and weedy arenas under spinning blue lights. Let’s not forget his passion for protecting the water and his twilight challenge to fix our nation’s great shame — the closer we get, the harder it’s going to be sometimes, and he saw that and he told us.

 
 

Edmonton Opera stages first openly LGBTQ production with Lilies

Edmonton Opera stages first openly LGBTQ production with Lilies

Edmonton Opera enters uncharted territory in the Jubilee on Saturday as it opens its season with a new opera that has already been acclaimed by audiences and critics since its premiere in Montreal in 2016. Lilies is an operatic adaptation by Australian composer Kevin March of the celebrated Canadian play Les Feluettes by Michel Marc Bouchard. In 2002, March saw the 1993 movie of the play directed by John Greyson, and had “the overwhelming sense I was watching an opera.” He discussed the possibility of an opera with Bouchard, and in 2011 the work was jointly commissioned by Opera Montreal and Pacific Opera in Victoria. Edmonton Opera’s production uses the designs and staging of the Montreal premiere and the subsequent Victoria performances. It is conducted by Giuseppe Pietraroia, the associate conductor and chorus master for the Victoria production. The opera is set in a prison in 1952. A bishop has come to visit on old classmate, Simon, who has been incarcerated there for 40 years. However, the prisoners force the Bishop to watch a re-creation they are putting on — an opera within an opera — of the events of 1912 that landed Simon in prison, and in which the Bishop was deeply complicit

 
 

Social Seen: VHS and Pop Culture Oddities Fair

Social Seen: VHS and Pop Culture Oddities Fair

Codie McLachlan hits some of our city’s best bashes to snap photos for our weekly Social Seen column. He is an Edmonton photojournalist. Email your event suggestions to  arts@edmontonjournal.com  or tweet Codie at  @fotocodie . Follow Codie on  Instagram  (@fotocodie) and  Facebook  ( facebook.com/fotocodie ) VHS and Pop Culture Oddities Fair Where: Brick and Whiskey When: Oct. 7 Who: Clean Up Your Act Productions Featuring: Vendors from across the province selling rare VHS tapes, cassettes and other collectibles as well as a draw for movies and a VCR Dawn Brown, left, and Marley Stevenson look through merchandise during the VHS and Pop Culture Oddities Fair at the Brick and Whiskey in Edmonton on Saturday, Oct.

 
 

Kings of Leon plays it straight at Rogers Place

Kings of Leon plays it straight at Rogers Place

No frills, low-pretension arena rock — lite to the cusp of heavy — is Kings of Leon’s game, and they played it to the four bends of the downtown arena this weekend. The Nashville band is a family affair — three brothers and a cousin — 35-year-old lead singer Caleb Followill dressed like a mechanic into Sgt. Pepper, his brothers Nathan drumming, Jared playing bass with the fourth Followill — cousin Matthew — on lead guitar. The Friday–night music deck was by flanked on either side of a tall-curtained theatre box by two giant Instagram screens, initially playing a cratered human heart beating with an engine inside. The light show and video show was generally minimal until later on. Opening mellow and backlit at 8:52 p.m

 
 

Jazz trio finds loose edge

Jazz trio finds loose edge

Sometimes making music is about finding the right fit. The right size of band, the right players or compositions, or the right amount of space. Edmonton’s Rubim de Toledo has shown himself to be one of the most consistently inspired musical tailors in Alberta jazz, an excellent, in-demand bassist, a gifted composer-arranger and a smart bandleader, too. That’s when he’s not at his usual posts, heading into his second year as section head for bass at MacEwan University, or at home helping to raise two young daughters. This week, he’s ready to prove all that again with a new album release, The Gap. Know that The Gap refers to a specific place in southern Alberta, where the Oldman River emerges from the Rocky Mountains (depicted in the CD cover photo).

 
 

Kitchen Confessions: I Hear She’s A Real Bitch author headlines LitFes

Kitchen Confessions: I Hear She’s A Real Bitch author headlines LitFes

You need only look around the Edmonton dining scene to see the challenges facing women in restaurant kitchens everywhere. With notable exceptions including local chefs Lindsay Porter, Doreen Prei and Shelley Robinson, there are precious few women in charge of the line cooks. Fewer still are in ownership positions, and even those tend to be in business with their life partners.

 
 

Arcade Fire brings Edmonton Everything Now at Rogers Place

Arcade Fire brings Edmonton Everything Now at Rogers Place

We used to talk about the separation of church and state more frantically, but one thing that continues to brazenly surround and envelop those two concepts is our luminous, better-not-question-it economic system. Never mind holy capitalism itself, one single cell phone brand holds more sway than most religions — and we’re all too wearily familiar with a certain businessman’s advertorial takeover of the most powerful nation on earth. Even before Wednesday night’s Arcade Fire show began, the 9,000-strong crowd was presented on the thin, LED ribbon screen inside the downtown arena a number of enigmatic brand logos — a cursive capital L, a tongue with an asterisk on it, a slick Möbius strip — as a faceless cowboy huckstered us into the show on screen. Clearly, we were being asked to think about our world (while simultaneously poked by said cowboy to buy T-shirts). Arcade Fire’s current tour is called Infinite Content, its accompanying album Everything Now, and together they continued in a cheerful and singalong way the band’s subtly dystopian worldview in a show where the visuals and satirical concepts were as strong as the music itself, down to an ad for a pointless USB fidget spinner and the band’s branded baseball team activewear. Nine strong, Arcade Fire is fronted by singers Win Butler and his wife Régine Chassagne, who walking through the crowd with the group like contenders took turns shining under a stage placed centrally on the floor as a boxing ring, ropes included

 
 
 
 

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